Hindu Religious and spiritual texts

Before getting into study of Hindu scriptures its essential to have a basic understanding of the classifications of Hindu texts. Unlike other organized religions Hinduism had no founder of central text because of which it evolved over thousands of years and had a large body of written material which can be confusing for a knowledge seeker. The image below provides a basic explanation of the categorization of Hindu texts. Scroll your mouse on the boxes to get more info on what that category means. Inside each tab below the image you will find the relevant books that belong inside each category.

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Aitareya-Taittiriya-Upanishads-with-Shankara-Bhashya-English-by-Sitaram-Sastri

Aitareya & Taittiriya Upanishads with Shankara Bhashya with English translation
by Sitaram Sastri

The Aitareya Upanishad is a Mukhya Upanishad, associated with the Rigveda. It comprises the fourth, fifth and sixth chapters of the second book of Aitareya Aranyaka, which is one of the four layers of Rig Vedic text. Aitareya Upanishad discusses three philosophical themes: first, that the world and man is the creation of the Atman (Soul, Universal Self); second, the theory that the Atman undergoes threefold birth; third, that Consciousness is the essence of Atman.

The Taittirīya Upanishad is the seventh, eighth and ninth chapters of Taittirīya Āraṇyaka, which are also called, respectively, the Śikṣāvallī, the Ānandavallī and the Bhṛguvallī. The Upanishad includes verses that are partly prayers and benedictions, partly instruction on phonetics and praxis, partly advice on ethics and morals given to graduating students from ancient Vedic gurukula-s (schools), partly a treatise on allegory, and partly philosophical instruction.

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Aprakashita-Upanishad-by-Kunhan-Raja

Aprakashita Upanishad
By Kunhan Raja

This volume contains seventy-one Upanishads, that are not included in the well-known one hundred and eight Upanishads. Manuscripts of many of these Upanishads are rare, and very few of them have been printed till now. This edition is based upon the manuscripts that are collected in the Adyar Library.

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Aitareya-Upanishad-by-T-N-Sethumadhavan

Aitareya Upanishad
By T N Sethumadhavan

Aitareya Upanishad is a common ground for philosophy and physics. It contains the mahavakya, the great aphorism “prajnanam brahma”, Consciousness is Brahman. Aitareya Upanishad identifies Consciousness as the First Cause of creation. This is forerunner of ‘Unified Field Theory’ or a ‘Theory of Everything’ which the modern physicists are trying to discover although the modern science does not recognize Consciousness as a factor in creation of the universe.

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Atharvaveda-Hindi-Bhashya-Pratham-Kandam

Atharvaveda Hindi Bhashya Pratham Kandam
By Kshemkaranda Trivedi

Atharvaveda is the fourth of the Vedas. For a long time it was not considered a Veda. Only Rigveda, Yajurveda and Samaveda were recognized as the triple Vedas (triveda). Historians believe that the Atharveda was included among the Vedas after the Vedic civilization matured and incorporated many traditions and practices of other groups and cultures. It may also be partly due to the growing influence of Shavisim, Shaktism or Tantrism. The Veda contains many mystic chants, spells and prayers meant to either heal or harm or seek protection against harmful forces.

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AtharvaVeda-vol-7-by-Charles-Rockwell-Lanman

AtharvaVeda vol 7
By Charles Rockwell Lanman – 1905

When, in 1855-6, the text of the Atharva-Veda was published by Professor Roth and myself, it was styled a “” first volume,”” and a second volume, of notes, indexes, etc., was promised. The promise was made in good faith, and with every intention of prompt fulfilment; but circumstances have deferred the latter,even till now. The bulk of the work was to have fallen to Professor Roth, not only because the bulk of the work on the first volume had fallen to me, but also because his superior learning and ability pointed him out as the one to undertake it.

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Brihadaranyaka-Upanishad-translated-by-Swami-Madhavananda

Brihadaranyaka Upanishad
translated By Swami Madhavananda

The long-felt want of a reliable, complete English translation of so important a book as Sankara’s Commentary on the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad has urged me to venture on this difficult undertaking. Had the long-promised translation by Dr. Ganganath Jha, in Mr. Seshachari’s series, come out, or had Dr. Rider been living to complete, and revise, his translation, which extends only up to the first chapter of the book and is long out of print, or if Prof. Hiriyanna of Mysore had completed his admirable edition, which discovers only the first three sections of that chapter, there would have been no necessity for another edition. But since the presentation m English of Sankara’s longest and greatest commentary on the Upanishads seemed to me to be overdue, I have prepared this edition for the use of those students of Vedanta whose knowledge of Sanskrit is not as high as that of English.

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Chandogya-Upanishad-with-Shankara-Bhashya-English-Translation-Part-1-by-Ganganath-Jha

Chandogya Upanishad With Sankara Bhashya-English-Part 1
By Ganganath Jha

Embedded in the Chandogya Brahmana of the Sama Veda of Hinduism Chandayoga upanishad is one of the oldest Upanishads. It lists as number 9 in the Muktika canon of 108 Upanishads. It is one of the largest Upanishadic compilations, and has eight Prapathakas (literally lectures, chapters), each with many volumes, and each volume contains many verses. The volumes are a motley collection of stories and themes. As part of the poetic and chants-focused Samaveda, the broad unifying theme of the Upanishad is the importance of speech, language, song and chants to man’s quest for knowledge and salvation, to metaphysical premises and questions, as well as to rituals.

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Chandogya-Upanishad-With-Sankara-Bhashya-English-Part2-by-Ganganath-Jha

Chandogya Upanishad With Sankara Bhashya-English-Part2
By Ganganath Jha

Embedded in the Chandogya Brahmana of the Sama Veda of Hinduism Chandayoga upanishad is one of the oldest Upanishads. It lists as number 9 in the Muktika canon of 108 Upanishads. It is one of the largest Upanishadic compilations, and has eight Prapathakas (literally lectures, chapters), each with many volumes, and each volume contains many verses. The volumes are a motley collection of stories and themes. As part of the poetic and chants-focused Samaveda, the broad unifying theme of the Upanishad is the importance of speech, language, song and chants to man’s quest for knowledge and salvation, to metaphysical premises and questions, as well as to rituals.

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Commentary-on-Katha-Upanishad-by-Krishnananda

Commentary on Katha Upanishad
By Krishnananda

There is a scripture similar to the Bhagavadgita in many respects, called the Katha Upanishad, the one from which the Bhagavadgita-teachings are believed by many to have been drawn. If the Bhagavadgita is a conversation between Sri Krishna and Arjuna, placed in the context of the historical event of the Mahabharata war, the Katha Upanishad is a conversation between Yama and Nachiketas. Just as we have the confusion of Arjuna’s mind in the beginning of the Bhagavadgita, we find intense aspiration on the part of Nachiketas in the beginning of the Kathopanishad. There are four important stages in its 6 teaching, even as the eighteen chapters of the Bhagavadgita reveal the stages of the sadhaka’s evolution. The Katha is magnificent in its poetic.

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Dashopanishad-by-Kunhan-Raja

Dashopanishad with commentary
By Kunhan Raja

The present volume contains the first eights of the ten major Upanishads namely, Isa, Kena, Katha, Prasna, Munddaka, Taittriya, and Aitreya along with commentary on the Upanisadbrahmayogin. There are other commentaries too for these ten main Upanishads but this commentary is the bhashya of Sanakaracharya. Yet this is not a mere repetition but a lot of embellishment and our own commentary has been added on top.

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Hyms-to-the-mystic-fire-by-Shre-Aurobindo

Hymns to the mystic fire
By Shree Aurobindo

Sri Aurobindo has unlocked the secret of the Rig Veda and in this book he has provided the translations for all hymns to Agni, the mystic fire, from the Rig Veda. Included for reference are the actual Sanskrit texts for each hymn. The “Doctrine of the Mystics” reveals the underlying philosophical, psychological and spiritual truths experienced by the sages. This book is for the seeker, the yogi, and the sage as well as the philosopher or student of comparative religion.

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Isavasya-Upanishad-with-Shankara-Bhashya

Isavasya Upanishad with Shankara Bhashya

The Ishavasya Upanishad (or simply Isha) is one of the shortest of its kind, and basically represents a brief philosophical poem discussing the soul/self (Atman).

The words “Isha vasyam” literally translates to “enveloped by the Lord” and refers to the theory of soul (Atman); a concept used in both dualism and non-dualism. This book however, including the commentary of Shankara, focuses on non-dualism (advaita).

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Isha Kena and Mandaka Upanishad
translated By V C Sheshadhari

The increasing interest evinced by the thinking world in the Philosophy and Religion of the Hindus has led me to undertake the publication of the translation of the principal Upanishads. The special feature of this publication is the translation of the complimentary of Sri Sankaracharya, the greatest exponent of the Advaita system of philosophy. The work has been undertaken chiefly with a view to bring within easy reach of . the English-reading public the j)priceless teachings of the Upanishads, in the light of the interpretation of Sri Sankaracharya. The spirit of the text and of the interpretation has, throughout been faithfully adhered to and, perhaps, in some instances, even to the detriment of elegance in diction.

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Isha-Upanishad-by-Shree-Aurobindo

Isha Upanishad
BY Shree Aurobindo

The Upanishads, being vehicles of illumination and not of instruction, composed for seekers who had already a general familiarity with the ideas of the Vedic and Vedantic seers and even some personal experience of the truths on which they were founded, dispense in their style with expressed transitions of thought and the development of implied or subordinate notions.Every verse in the Isha Upanishad reposes on a number of ideas implicit in the text but nowhere set forth explicitly; the reasoning also that supports its conclusions is suggested by the words, not expressly conveyed to the intelligence. The reader, or rather the hearer, was supposed to proceed from light to light, confirming his intuitions and verifying by his experience, not submitting the ideas to the judgment of the logical reason.

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Kashyapa-Shilpa-Shastra-Sthapatya-Veda-in-Sanskrit

Kashyapa Shilpa Shastra Sthapatya Veda in Sanskrit

Sthapatya veda is the knowledge of Vedic architecture. This knowledge comes from a 5,000-year-old Hindu text and is thought to predate Chinese feng shui. Sthapatya (sta-pat-ya) can be translated as “to establish” and veda as “knowledge.” Sthapatya veda uses the circadian cycle, yet this knowledge expands to include the universe itself. The five elements — air, earth, fire, water and space — are also important factors in building design.

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Kena-Upanishad-by-Ganga-Prasadji

Kena Upanishad
By Ganga Prasadji

Upanishad literally means sitting near God . The word is applied to books teaching Knowledge of God or Spiritual Knowledge. Kena- Upanishad comes second among the ten Upanishads,(viz. Isha, Kena, Katha, Prashna, Mundaka, Mandukya, Aitareya Taittiriya, Chhandogya, and Vrihadaranyaka), which are regarded as the most ancient and authoritative. It forms part of the Talavakara Brahman of the Sama Veda, and its proper name is ‘Talavakara-Upanishad’. It is called Kena Upanishad from its first word Kena, as the first or Vajasaneyi Upanishad is called Isha Upanishad because it begins with the word “”Isha””. The Upanishad has for its basis a Sukta in the Atharva Veda (x 2) which is also called Kena from the first word of the Sukta.

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Kena-Upanishad-with-Hindi-translation

Kena Upanishad with Hindi translation
By Sthapatya Veda

Sthapatya Veda is one of the structuring dynamics of Rk Veda. It highlights the quality involved in structuring Rk Veda. With reference to consciousness, Sthapatya Veda comprises the specific sets of laws of Nature that are engaged in promoting the quality of Chhandas — the object of observation, which hides the dynamism of Devata in the witnessing quality of Rishi — within the Samhita level of consciousness, providing a structure to the eternally silent, self-referral, self-sufficient, fully awake state of consciousness, which is intimately personal to everyone.

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Mundaka-and-Mandukya-Upanishads-Swami-Sarvanand-Sanskrit-English

Mundaka and Mandukya Upanishads
By Swami Sarvanand Sanskrit-English

Mundaka literally means a razor or one with a shaven head (i.e. a sanyasi). This Upanishad is called so probably because of two reasons. Firstly because it cleanses the soul be removing all ignorance. Secondly because it strongly prefer a sanyasis life to a householders. It is attached to the Atharvaveda belongin to the shaunakhiya shaka.

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Nitiprakashika-Dhanurveda

Nitiprakashika – Dhanurveda

Dhanurveda, the standard work on Vedic military science being lost, the dissertations on the science found in the Mahabharata, the Agni Purana, Akasa Bhairava Tantra, Kautalya Arthasastra, Manusmriti, and other small works on Dhanurveda like Ausanas Dhanurveda, Vasistha Dhanurveda, Sadasiva Dhanurveda and Niti Prakasika are the only source of information on the subject left to us.

The Nitiprakaéika is ascribed to Vaiéampayana and gives among other valuable matter a full account of the Dhanur veda. It contains in fact the only accurate description which w e possess of the various arms and war implements of the ancient Hindus.

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On-the-Weapons-Army-Organisation-and-Political-Maxims-of-the-Ancient-Hindus-by-Gustav-Oppert

On the Weapons Army Organization and Political Maxims of the Ancient Hindus
By Gustav Oppert

While pursuing my researches into ancient Indian history I lighted upon two ancient Sanskrit manuscripts containing interesting information on many new and important topics. One of them , the Nitiprakaéika, has been, I believe, up to now, utterly unknown, and the other, the Sukraniti, though known to exist, has never been properly described and published. The Nitiprakaéika is ascribed to Vaiéampayana and gives among other valuable matter a full account of the Dhanur veda. It contains in fact the only accurate description which w e possess of the various arms and war implements of the ancient Hindus. I esteemed it therefore proper to give as many passages as possible in full, though well aw are I run the risk of tiring the reader by a long enumeration of weapons.

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Prashna-Upanishad-by-Swami-Sarvanand

Prashna Upanishad
By Swami Sarvanand

This Upanishad has derived its name from the six questions it contains. It belongs to the Atharva Veda and is probably of the Pippalada Sakha. Sankara calls it a Brahmana and complementary to the Mantra Upanishad of the Mundaka which also belongs to the same Veda. There are six chapters in the Upanishad and each starts with a question. The first question refers to the origin of Prana, the second is about constituents of human personality, third is the third is nature of prana, fourth is about the psychological aspect of human personality, fifth is about pranava and sixth is about metaphysical principle in man.

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Rig-Veda-in-Hindi-by-pundit-Ramgovind-Trivedi

Rig Veda in Hindi
By pundit Ramgovind Trivedi

A hindi translation of the complete Rig Veda into Hindi, in a single volume. The text is not included. But the translation is simple, readable and fairly accurate. Includes all ten books.

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Rig-Veda-in-Sanskrit-and-Hindi

Rig Veda in Sanskrit and Hindi

The Rig Veda is the oldest of the Vedas. All the other Vedas are based upon it and consist to a large degree of various hymns from it. It consists of a thousand such hymns of different seers, each hymn averaging around ten verses. The Rig Veda is the oldest book in Sanskrit or any Indo-European language. Its date is debatable. Many great Yogis and scholars who have understood the astronomical references in the hymns, date the Rig Veda as before 4000 B.C., perhaps as early as 12,000. Modern western scholars tend to date it around 1500 B.C., though recent archeological finds in India (like Dwaraka) now appear to require a much earlier date.

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Shri-Madhavacharya-Bhashya-on-Chandayoda-Upanishad-by-Nagesh-Sonde

Shri Madhavacharya Bhashya on Chandayoda Upanishad
By Nagesh Sonde

In my study of various scriptures, I have experienced the vast sweep of intellectual ideas expressed with clarity of vision and purity of heart, in highly arresting poetic signs and symbols as well as down to earth , rational, reasonable, and well argued, well debated logical conclusions. Every seer and saint is said to have experienced the Truth, Satya. The Prime existence in its true and pure form in every thing that is manifest creation and every manifest thing in the supreme Self, but when he expresses it and communicates it is as per his attributes and inclinations which has shaped his thoughts speech and actions using the signs, symbols, legends I the language which he knows and which the people, the place and the period know where and when he communicates.

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Samgita-Ratnakara-Gandharva-Veda

Sangita Ratnakara
By Sharngadeva 1250 AD

It is one of the most important Sanskrit musicological texts from India, which both Hindustani music and Carnatic music regard as a definitive text.

The text is also known as Saptadhyayi as it is divided into seven chapters. The first six chapters, Svaragatadhyaya, Ragavivekadhyaya, Prakirnakadhyaya, Prabandhadhyaya, Taladhyaya and Vadyadhyaya deal with the various aspects of music and musical instruments while the last chapter Nartanadhyaya deals with dance. The medieval era text is one of the most complete historic Hindu treatises on the structure, technique and reasoning behind ragas (chapter 2) and talas (chapter 5) that has survived into the modern era.

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Samveda-in-Hindi

Samveda in Hindi

The Samaveda (Sanskrit: सामवेद, sāmaveda, from sāman “song” and veda “knowledge”), is the Veda of melodies and chants. It is an ancient Vedic Sanskrit text, and part of the scriptures of Hinduism. One of the four Vedas, it is a liturgical text whose 1,875 verses are primary derived from the Rigveda.

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Taittiriya-Upanishad-by-Swami-Sarvanand

Taittiriya Upanishad
By Swami Sarvanand

This Upanishad has been so named because it forms a part of the Taittiriya Aranyaka of the Krishna Yajur Veda. Taittiriya Aranyaka itself forms the latter part of the Taittiriya Brahmana and this Upanishad constitutes the seventh, eight, and ninth prapathakas of the said Aranyaka. The Taittiriya recension of the Krishna Yajur Veda got its nomenclature from the tradition that when the great sage Yajnavika was asked by his offended guru to return back the Veda which the former had studied under him, Yajnavika threw it out and other rishis taking the form of Tittiris (partridges) swallowed the Veda thus thrown out. This is a very popular Upanishad because it is still chanted as a part of many religious ceremonies in India.

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The-Aitareya-Brahmanam-of-the-Rigveda

The Aitareya Brahmanam of the Rigveda – Volume 1
Translated by Martin Haug

The Aitareya Brahmana (Sanskrit: ऐतरेय ब्राह्मण) is the Brahmana of the Shakala shakha of the Rigveda, an ancient Indian collection of sacred hymns. This work, according to the tradition, is ascribed to Mahidasa Aitareya.

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The-Katha-And-Prasna-Upanishads-Vol-I

The Katha And Prasna Upanishads Vol I
Translated by Sitaram Shastri

The Katha Upanishad (Devanagari: कठोपनिषद्) (Kaṭhopaniṣad) is one of the mukhya (primary) Upanishads, embedded in the last short eight sections of the Kaṭha school of the Yajurveda. It is also known as Kāṭhaka Upanishad, and is listed as number 3 in the Muktika canon of 108 Upanishads.

The Katha Upanishad consists of two chapters (Adhyāyas), each divided into three sections (Vallis). The first Adhyaya is considered to be of older origin than the second. The Upanishad is the legendary story of a little boy, Nachiketa – the son of Sage Vajasravasa, who meets Yama (the Indian deity of death). Their conversation evolves to a discussion of the nature of man, knowledge, Atman (Soul, Self) and moksha (liberation).

The Prashna Upanishad (Sanskrit: प्रश्न उपनिषद्, Praśna Upaniṣad) is an ancient Sanskrit text, embedded inside Atharva Veda, ascribed to Pippalada sakha of Vedic scholars. It is a Mukhya (primary) Upanishad, and is listed as number 4 in the Muktika canon of 108 Upanishads of Hinduism.

The Prashna Upanishad contains six Prashna (questions), and each is a chapter with a discussion of answers.[2] The chapters end with the phrase, prasnaprativakanam, which literally means, “”thus ends the answer to the question.

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The-Secret-Of-The-Veda-by-Aurobindo

The Secret Of The Veda
Shree Aurobindo

Sri Aurobindo breaks new ground in interpreting the ancient Vedas. His deeper insight into this came from his own spiritual practices for which he found vivid allegorical descriptions in the Vedas. Sri Aurobindo was able to uncover the mystery of the double meanings, the inner psychological and yogic significance and practices and the consistent, clear sense brought by this psychological view of the Vedic hymns. Finally, the true inner meaning of the Veda and its relevance to the seeking after self-realization and enlightenment is revealed.

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Upanishads-Explained

Upanishads Explained

This booklet contains a brief explanation of each of the Upanishads and what its contents are. It is not an in depth study of the Upanishads but more of a primer or 101 level for a beginner to get familiar.

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Vivekananda On Vedas And Upanishads
By system Gayatripriya

After fourteen years of continuous work, the compilation, Swami Vivekananda on the Vedas and Upanishads, is now ready to come to the light of day. It began, partially as a response to the current confusion over the coherency of Swami Vivekananda’s Neo-Vedanta and partially as a search for the essence of his message to contemporary humanity. As time went by, the volume of the work and a certain compelling pattern of inner organization built up a critical mass and momentum which swept the project forward to its present state of completion. A number of loose ends remain untied, however. Perhaps that is a good thing, for it provides opportunities for readers to make contributions and additions to the overall body of the work.

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Yajurveda-with-Hindi-translation

Yajurveda with Hindi translation

The Yajurveda (Sanskrit: यजुर्वेद, yajurveda, from yajus meaning “”prose mantra”” and veda meaning “”knowledge””) is the Veda of prose mantras. An ancient Vedic Sanskrit text, it is a compilation of ritual offering formulas that were said by a priest while an individual performed ritual actions such as those before the yajna fire. Yajurveda is one of the four Vedas, and one of the scriptures of Hinduism.

The Yajurveda is broadly grouped into two – the “”black”” (Krishna) Yajurveda and the “”white”” (Shukla) Yajurveda. The term “”black”” implies “”the un-arranged, unclear, motley collection”” of verses in Yajurveda, in contrast to the “”white”” which implies the “”well arranged, clear”” Yajurveda. The black Yajurveda has survived in four recensions, while two recensions of white Yajurveda have survived into the modern times.

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Svetasvatara-Upanishad-by-Swami-Tyagisananda

Svetasvatara Upanishad
By Swami Tyagisananda

The Svetasvatara upanishad is a short upanishad consisting of 113 mantras divided into six chapters. It belongs to Krsnayurveda. It gets its name from sage Svetaswara who is said to have taught this to his disciples. It is not one of the more ancient Upanishads that are generally considered to be the major ones.

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arthashatra-of-chanakya-translated-by-ramshastry

Arthashastra
Written By Chanakya (also called Kautilya), translated by Ramshastry.

This was written by Chanakya, the guru of Chandragupt Maurya. Its a comprehensive manual on statecraft and governance policies. The text was assumed lost till a manuscript was discovered in 1904 in Sanskrit on palm leaves. It was given by a Tamil Brahmin from Tanjore to the newly opened Mysore Oriental Library headed by Benjamin Lewis Rice.R. Shamasastry identified it and published English translations of the text in installments, in journals.

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charaksanhita

Charakasanhita
Edited in 1877 By Pundit Jibananda Vidyasagar and printed by Harvard university.

This book is in Sankrit original verses. It is one of the two surviving Ayurvedic texts estimated between 100 & 200 BC. It describes ancient theories on human body, etiology, symptomology and therapeutics for a wide range of diseases. The Charaka Samhita also includes sections on the importance of diet, hygiene, prevention, medical education, the teamwork of a physician, nurse and patient necessary for recovery to health.

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Sushruta Samhita
By Sushruta originally and edited by Kinja Lal Bishagratna

The Sushruta Samhita is an ancient Sanskrit treatise on medicine and surgery. It is an epic text of Ayurveda alongside the Caraka-Saṃhitā and the Bheḷa-Saṃhitā.

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Kashyapa-Shilpa-Shastra-Sthapatya-Veda-in-Sanskrit

Kashyapa Shilpa Shastra Sthapatya Veda in Sanskrit
Shilpa Shastras literally means the Science of Shilpa (arts and crafts). It is an ancient umbrella term for numerous Hindu texts that describe arts, crafts, and their design rules, principles and standards. In the context of temple design, Shilpa Shastras were manuals for sculpture and Hindu iconography, prescribing among other things, the proportions of a sculptured figure, composition, principles, meaning, as well as rules of architecture.

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Manushyalaya candrika – Sthapatya veda

Manushyalaya Chandrika is a sixteenth century CE treatise in Sanskrit dealing with domestic architecture. The work is authored by Thirumangalath Neelakanthan Musath and is a summarization of the basic principles of domestic architecture then widely followed in that region of India now known as Kerala State.[1] The popularity of the text as a basic reference of traditional Kerala architecture has continued even to modern times. From the references to the deities in temples at Triprangode, Trikkandiyur, Alathiyur, etc. in the opening invocation of the treatise it can be safely surmised that the author of the work should have been a native of some place close to these temples. Nothing much is known about the life of the author other than that he has also authored a work on elephantology titled Mathangaleela.

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Mayamatam vastu shastra – Sthapatya Ved

The Mayamata is a Vastusastra, that is to say a ‘treatise on dwelling’ and, as such, it deals with all the facets of gods’ and men’s dwellings, from the choice of a site to the iconography of temple walls. It contains numerous and precise descriptions of villages and towns as well as of temples, houses, mansions and palaces. It gives indications for the selection of a proper orientation, of right dimensions and of appropriate building materials. It intends to be a manual for the architect and a guide-book for the layman. Well-thought-of by the traditional architects (sthapati-s) of South India, this treatise is of interest at a time when technical traditions, in all fields are being scrutinized for their possible modern application. Mamuni Mayan is a culture hero character from Tamil Sangam literature (the Silappathikaram, Manimekalai, and Civaka Cintamani epics), identified with the asura Maya Dānava (Mayasura) of the Mahabharata,the mythical founder of Vastu Shastra.

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Manasara-Sthapatya veda

Manasara, sometimes spelled Manava sara, has extensive discussions on architecture, guidelines for ancient village and town planning, it has section on metal art works as well.

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Niti prakashika – Dhanur Veda

Nitiprakashika is a treatise delineating Nitishastra, i.e. Rajaniti and Dhanurvidya scripted by Sage Vaishampayana who learnt it from his guru Veda Vyasa and became the master of its Taittiriya branch, and revealed it to the King Janamejaya.

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On the Weapons Army Organization and Political Maxims of the Ancient Hindus
by Gustav Oppert

While pursuing my researches into ancient Indian history I lighted upon two ancient Sanskrit manuscripts containing interesting information on many new and important topics. One of them , the Nitiprakaéika, has been, I believe, upto now , utterly unknown, and the other, the Sukraniti though known to exist, has never been properly described and published. The Nitiprakaéika is ascribed to Vaiéampayana and gives among other valuable matter a full account of the Dhanur veda. It contains in fact the only accurate description which we possess of the various arms and war implements of the ancient Hindus. I esteemed it therefore proper to give as many passages as possible in full, though well aw are I run the risk of tiring the reader by a long enumeration of weapons.

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Vasishtha Dhanur Veda

Dhanur veda or the science of military is one of the principle Upaveda, a part of the Yajurveda. Treatises on this have been written by sage Brihaspati, Shukra, Brihu, Viswamitra and Vasistha among others. Most of them are lost but some of them are extant. This is a Sanskrit version of some part of the work by sage Vasistha.

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Viragama – Sthapatya Ved

Sthapatya Ved is the art and science of architecture. Anyone who has visited the great temples of India, especially the Minaxi temple, Tirupathi temple in southern India and the Kayllas temple in northern India has experienced a sense of inner happiness and fulfillment simply by being in the structure. In addition to the spiritual activities at these temples, there are precise mathematical and astrological calculations, proportions of building plan, specific orientation and the applied knowledge of subtle physical properties which produces this feeling of well being.

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sushruta-samhita-ancient-ayurvedic-text

Sushruta Samhita ancient Ayurvedic text
By Sushruta originally and edited by Kinja Lal Bishagratna

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Channdas

Brhat-Pingala

Brhat Pingala

Pingala is the traditional name of the author of the Chandaḥśāstra (also Chandaḥsūtra), the earliest known Sanskrit treatise on prosody. The Chandaḥśāstra presents the first known description of a binary numeral system in connection with the systematic enumeration of meters with fixed patterns of short and long syllables. The discussion of the combinatorics of meter corresponds to the binomial theorem. Halāyudha’s commentary includes a presentation of the Pascal’s triangle (called meruprastāra). Pingala’s work also contains the Fibonacci numbers, called mātrāmeru.

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Chhanda-sutram-by-Pingala

Chhanda sutram by Pingala

The Chandah Sutra is also known as Chandah sastra, or Pingala Sutras after its author Pingala. It is the oldest Hindu treatise on prosody to have survived into the modern era. This text is structured in 8 books, with a cumulative total of 310 sutras. It is a collection of aphorisms predominantly focussed on the art of poetic meters, and presents some mathematics in the service of music.

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Vyakarna

Vyakarana-Mahabhasya

Vyakarna Mahabhsya

The Mahābhāṣya (Sanskrit: महाभाष्य, IPA: [məɦɑːbʱɑːʂjə], great commentary), attributed to Patañjali, is a commentary on selected rules of Sanskrit grammar from Pāṇini’s treatise, the Ashtadhyayi, as well as Kātyāyana’s Varttika, an elaboration of Pāṇini’s grammar.[1] It is dated to the 4th century BCE. It was with Patañjali that the Indian tradition of language scholarship reached its definite form. The system thus established is extremely detailed as to shiksha (phonology, including accent) and vyakarana (grammar and morphology). Syntax is scarcely touched, because syntax is not important in this highly inflexional language, but nirukta (etymology) is discussed, and these etymologies naturally lead to semantic explanations. People interpret his work to be a defense of Pāṇini, whose Sutras are elaborated meaningfully. Patañjali also examines Kātyāyana rather severely. But the main contributions of Patañjali lies in the treatment of the principles of grammar enunciated by him.

Kātyayana introduced semantic discourse into grammar, which was further elaborated by Patañjali to such an extent that Mahābhāṣya can be called a mix of grammar as such as well as a philosophy of grammar. Kāśika-vritti by Jayāditya and Vāmana (mentioned by Itsing) included viewpoints of other grammarians also which did not conform to Patañjali’s views. Many commentaries on Mahābhāṣya were written, of which Kaiyaṭa’s commentary named Pradīpa (c. 11th century CE) is most celebrated.

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Varahamihira-Horasastram

Varahamihira Horasastram

Vrahamihira’s name stands foremost among the astronomers of not only India but of the world. He wrote at a period when considerable advance had been made in both subjects and their treatment had been fused together. He easily excelled his predecessors in the range and the depth of his knowledge and in his intuition which is marvelous.

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Vakyapadiya

Vakyapadiya

Bhartṛhari is the author of the Vākyapadīya (“”[treatise] on words and sentences””). The work is divided into three books, the Brahma-kāṇḍa, (or Āgama-samuccaya “”aggregation of traditions””), the Vākya-kāṇḍa, and the Pada-kāṇḍa (or Prakīrṇaka “”miscellaneous””).

He theorized the act of speech as being made up of three stages:

Conceptualization by the speaker (Paśyantī “”idea””)
Performance of speaking (Madhyamā “”medium””)
Comprehension by the interpreter (Vaikharī “”complete utterance””).

Bhartṛhari develops this doctrine in a metaphysical setting, where he views sphoṭa as the language capability of man, revealing his consciousness. Indeed, the ultimate reality is also expressible in language, the śabda-brahman, or “”Eternal Verbum””.

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Nirukta

The-Nighantu-and-the-Nirukta

The Nighantu and the Nirukta

Nighantu is a Sanskrit term for a traditional collection of words, grouped into thematic categories, often with brief annotations. Such collections share characteristics with glossaries and thesauri, but are not true lexicons, such as the kośa of Sanskrit literature. Particular collections are also called nighaṇṭava.

While a number of nighantavas devoted to specialized subjects exist, the eponymous Nighantu of the genre is an ancient collection, handed down from Vedic times. A critical edition of the Nighantu and the Nirukta was published in the 1920s by Lakshman Sarup. In it, two major recensions were identified, one longer than the other, indicating additions at untraceable yet relatively early dates. It is now customary to render both recensions together, with the additions of the longer recension in parentheses.

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The-Nirukta-of-Yaska

The Nirukta of Yaska

Nirukta means “explained, interpreted” and refers to one of the six ancient Vedangas, or ancillary science connected with the Vedas – the scriptures of Hinduism. Nirukta covers etymology, and is the study concerned with correct interpretation of Sanskrit words in the Vedas. Nirukta is the systematic creation of a glossary and it discusses how to understand archaic, uncommon words. The most ancient complete surviving text of this field is a commentary on Nighantu by Yāska, who probably lived about the 5th century BCE. A central premise of Yaska was that man creates more new words to conceptualize and describe action, that is nouns often have verbal roots. However, added Yaska, not all words have verbal roots. He asserted that both the meaning and the etymology of words are always context dependent.[6] Words are created around object-agent, according to Yaska, to express external or internal reality perceived by man, and are one of six modifications of Kriya (action) and Bhava (dynamic being), namely being born, existing, changing, increasing, decreasing and perishing.

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Shikha

Naradiya-Shiksha

Naradiyua Siksha

Naradiya Shiksha is a text that deals mainly with the musical notes and the pronunciation of the words in the Vedic language. Some believe it might pre-date Bharatha’s Natyashastra. Narada suggests an ardent student of music must lead a disciplined and well regulated life; meditate at proper times. He should learn to pronounce the Mantras clearly and crisply. He recommends consumption of Tri-phala-churna ( a powder) mixed with salt for digestion , memory and lucid pronunciation. He also recommends breathing in of its smoke and also have honey (Madhu). He says, for securing a clear and sweet voice and attractive teeth, one should use the slick of a mango or wood-apple. Either for learning Vedas or Music, it is essential to have clear voice, self control, attention, sound approach. A student of Music should learn to recognize the divinity in the Svaras.

The Narada Shiksha while explaining the Sama music states that there were three Gramas (Shadja, Madhyama and Gandharva). It also mentions that each Grama has seven Murchanas (a total of 21 Murchanas). (But, it does not define Grama or Murchana). It was said; the set of Murchanas related to Gandharva.

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Siksha-samagraha

Shikhsha samagraha

Shiksha is the field of Vedic study of sound, focusing on the letters of the Sanskrit alphabet, accent, quantity, stress, melody and rules of euphonic combination of words during a Vedic recitation. Each ancient Vedic school developed this field of Vedanga, and the oldest surviving phonetic textbooks are the Pratishakyas. Shiksha is the oldest and the first auxiliary discipline to the Vedas, maintained since the Vedic era.[2] It aims at construction of sound and language for synthesis of ideas, in contrast to grammarians who developed rules for language deconstruction and understanding of ideas.[2] This field helped preserve the Vedas and the Upanishads as the canons of Hinduism since the ancient times, and shared by various Hindu traditions.

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Jyotish

Shatpanchashika-V-S-Sastri

Shatpanchashika
V S Sastri

Astrology is rightly termed as one of the Shadangas – the six works auxiliary to the Vedas. The present work Prasna Sasrta and is condensed in 56 shlokas. The author Prituhuyaas is son of the celebrated astronomer, Varahamihira one of the nine gems of Vikramaditya’s court Author assumes a preliminary knowledge of astronomy and it is understood that the reader masters the first two chapters of the Brihat Jataka.

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Vedanga-Jyotisa-of-Lagadha

Vedanga Jyotisa of Lagadha

The Vedanga Jyotish of sage Lagadha is highly significant in the history of science in India in the sense that it is the earliest full-fledged treatise on Indian astronomy. As an adjunct to the Vedic lore, it forms a manual for the determination of rituals and sacrifices by the Vedic priest and for the preparation of a handy calendar for social and religious events. the work is current in two recensions, one in 36 verses relate to the Rigveda and the other in 43 verses related to the Yajurveda.

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Brihat-Jataka-2nd-Ed-by-V-Subrahmanya-Sastri

Brhat Jataka

Brihat Jataka or Brihat Jatakam or Brihajjatakam (Sanskrit: बृहज्जातकम), is one of the five principal texts written by Varahamihira, the other four being Panchasiddhantika, Brihat Samhita, Laghu Jataka and Yogayatra. It is also one of the five major treatises on Hindu Predictive Astrology, the other four being Saravali of Kalyanverma, Sarvartha Chintamani of Venkatesh, Jataka Parijata of Vaidyanatha and Phaladeepika of Mantreswara. The study of this classic text makes one grasp the fundamentals of astrology.

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Muhurtha-Rathnam

Muhurtha Ratnam
By Govinda Bhattateri

Govinda Bhaṭṭathiri (also known as Govinda Bhattathiri of Thalakkulam or Thalkkulathur) (c. 1237 – 1295) was an Indian astrologer and astronomer who flourished in Kerala during the thirteenth century CE. His major work was Dasadhyayi, a commentary on the first ten chapters of the astrological text Brihat Jataka composed by Varāhamihira (505 – 587 CE). This is considered to be the most important of the 70 known commentaries on this text. Bhaṭṭathiri had also authored another important work in astrology titled Muhūrttaratnaṃ.

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Surya-Siddhanta-in-English

Surya Siddhanta in English

The Surya Siddhanta is the name of multiple treatises (siddhanta) in Indian astronomy. It has rules laid down to determine the true motions of the luminaries, which conform to their actual positions in the sky. It gives the locations of several stars other than the lunar nakshatras and treats the calculation of solar eclipses as well as solstices, e.g., summer solstice 21/06. Significant coverage is on kinds of time, length of the year of gods and demons, day and night of god Brahma, the elapsed period since creation, how planets move eastwards and sidereal revolution. The Earth’s diameter and circumference are also given. Eclipses and color of the eclipsed portion of the moon are mentioned.

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Kalpa texts – Grihya and Srauta sutrams

Apastamba-Grihya-Sutra

Apasthamba griha sutra

This is attributed to sage Apastamba and is supposed to be a South Indian text. It is a collection of mantras to be recited in the course of the ceremonies treated of in it, the mantras being arranged in a fixed order, which the sutra scrupulously follows in the arrangement of its component parts even at the sacrifice of their natural order, The collection is divided into two prainas forming the 25th and the 26th of what is the Apastamba Kalpasutra.

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Aapstamba-Shulba-sutra

Aapstamba Shulba sutra

The Apasthamba sulbha sutra forms the last prasna of the Kalpa sutra of Apasthamba which is divided into thirty sections or prasnas. This work deals with the principles of a technical character applicable chiefly to the construction of altars for sacrifices and is indispensable guide to students of Vedic sacrificial rites. It consists of six patalas divided into twenty one khandas.

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Bodhayana-Grihya-sutra

Bodhayana-Grihya

Bodhayana was a great saint who was the son of Sage Kanva. He has written Grihya Suthras which are followed by many Iyer Brahmins. He belonged to the Krishna Yajur Veda.

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Hiranyakeshi-Grihya-Sutram

Hiranyakeshi Grihya Sutram

Hiranyakeshi Dharmasutra belongs to the Taittiriya Shaka of Krishna Yajurveda. It is part of Hiranyakeshi Kalpa. It is a textbook on rules of conduct and religious and civil law. The text is credited to Satyasadha Hiranyakeshi.

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Jaimini-Grihya-Sutram

Jaimini Grihya Sutram

The name of Maharishi Jaimini is held in high esteem and reverence among the Sanskrit writers of eminence and probably he is held only next to Maharishi Vedavyasa. Jaimini is the disciple of Vyasa, and besides being a writer of various treatises and the Epic Jaimini Bharata, he is the famous author of Poorva Mimamsa Sastra, and these able aphorisms in Astrology called after his name as the Jaimini griha sutras.

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Katha-Kagruha-by-W-Caland

Katha Kagruha Grihya

In the by W Caland

year 1875 Buehlr discovered in Kashmir four manuscripts of a Griha sutra which was thus far known only by the name “”Kathaka Griha Sutram’. These manuscripts were acquired by government and used by various European scholars. This books lists our the shlokas found in the various manuscripts.

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Khadira-grhya-sutra

Khadira grihya sutram

This book deals with ceremonies and rituals of everyday life of a layperson in Vedic times.

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Manava-Grahya-Sutram-by-Gaekwad

Manava Grahya Sutram by Gaekwad

This belongs to Krishna Yajurveda. The various passages of the sutram deal with ceremonies for various life events like birth, upanayanan, marriage, retirement etc.

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The-Grihya-sutras-part-1-by-Herman-Oldenberg

The Grihya sutras part 1
by Herman Oldenberg

The Grihya Sutras are sacred Hindu texts containing information regarding Vedic domestic rites and rituals meant for the householders. They were rendered into compositions probably during the same period when the Dharmashastras or the Hindu law books were composed. The Grihya Sutras as their name suggests deal with domestic rituals such as conception, birth, initiation (upanayanam), marriage, death etc.

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The-Grihya-sutras-part-2-by-Herman-Oldenberg

The Grihya sutras part 2
by Herman Oldenberg

The Grihya Sutras are sacred Hindu texts containing information regarding Vedic domestic rites and rituals meant for the householders. They were rendered into compositions probably during the same period when the Dharmashastras or the Hindu law books were composed. The Grihya Sutras as their name suggests deal with domestic rituals such as conception, birth, initiation (upanayanam), marriage, death etc.

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Vaikhanasa-Grihya-Sutram

Vaikhanasa Grihya Sutra

According to one interpretation, Vaikhanasa is the ancient word for Vanaprastha (life of a forest dweller or hermit). Vanaprastha, according to the scheme of man’s lifespan as developed during the later Vedic age*, is the third stage (ashrama) in a man’s life. It is the stage prior to and in preparation for Sanyasa the last stage of total withdrawal from the world.

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Asvalayana-Srauta-Sutra

Asvalayana-Srauta

Among the twenty-one Sakha-Samhitas of the Rigveda, as mentioned by Patanjali, only seven Samhitas were known by name and among these too, only one Sakala-Samhita was available in printed form so far. Now with the publication of the present editon of the Ashvalayana-Samhita a complete picture of a new Sakha-Samhita will come to fore for the first time. In comparison to the Sakala-Samhita, the Ashvalayana-Samhita has 212 additional mantras among which some occur in the common suktas and others form 16 additional complete suktas. Among these additional suktas special mention may be made of Kapinjala-sukta (II.44), Lakshmi-sukta (V.88-89), Pavamana-sukta (IX.68), Hiranya-sukta (X.130), Medha-sukta (X.155) and Manasa-sukta (X.171).

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Baudhayana-srauta by W Caland vol 2

The Baudhayana Shrauta Sutra (Baudhāyana Śrautasūtra or Baudhāyanaśrautasūtram) is a Late Vedic text dealing with the solemn rituals of the Taittiriya Shakha school of the Black Yajurveda that was composed in eastern Uttar Pradesh during the late Brahmana period. Baudhayana, the traditional author of the Sutra, originally belonged to the Kanva school of the White Yajurveda. W. Caland has adduced materials that indicate Baudhayana’s shift from this tradition to that of the Taittiriya school.

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Manava-Srauta-Sutra-Cayana

Manava Srauta Sutra Cayana

The Sanskrit word Śrauta is rooted in śruti (that which is heard, referring to scriptures of Hinduism). Śrauta, states Johnson, is an adjective that is applied to a text, ritual practice or person, when related to śruti.The word is sometimes spelled Shrauta in scholarly literature. This particular Srauta belongs to the Yajurveda.

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Sankhayana-Srauta

Sankhayana-Srauta

The Sankhayana Srauta Sutra is one of the two sutras thus far known which treat of the duties of the Hotar and his assistants at the celebration of the so called Srauta or Vaitanikasacrifices beginning with the Darsa-pura-masa Isi and ending with the complicated SAttras.

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Varaha-Srauta-by-W-Caland

Varaha Srauta
by W Caland

Śrautasūtras are to ritual-related sutras based on the śruti. The first versions of the Kalpa (Vedanga) sutras were probably composed by the sixth century BCE, starting about the same time as the Brahmana layer of the Vedas were composed and most ritual sutras were complete by around 300 BCE. They were attributed to famous Vedic sages in the Hindu tradition. These texts are written aphoristic sutras style, and therefore are taxonomies or terse guidebooks rather than detailed manuals or handbooks for any ceremony.

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Bharadvaja-sutras

Bharadvaja sutras

The grhyastitra of Bharadvaja is not widely known: it is never quoted in the nibandhas. Probably the school of the Bharadvajins, whose seat may have been in Southern India, came to an end at an early period. The contents of our sutra are rather extensive. The succession of the different subjects is not very logical; I can not find any system in it. It looks as if the bhasyakara has also felt this defect. In his introduction he gives a more logical division of the matter.
First, he says, come the rules for the seven pakayajiias, the seven haviryajnas and the seven somayajnas; then follow the garbhadhana, pumsavana, simantonnayana, jatakarman, namakarana, annaprasana, cauda, upanayana, the four vedavratas, the samavartana, sahadharmacarinlsamyoga (vivaha) and finally the five mahayajnas; together forty ceremonies. As his source for this division he mentions Gautama. We

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Drahyayana-Srautha-sutra

Drahyayana Srautha sutra

This Srauta text is a part of the Samaveda. It contains chantings for various everyday ceremonies and rituals.

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Nidana-Sutra-of-Patanjali

Nidana Sutra of Patanjali

The Nidana Sutras of the Samaveda is shrouded in obscurity. The whoe Nidana sutra is in ten Prapathakas. It is however very important to the Vedic ritual literature/ It throws much light on rare works of other authors. It contains a rich treasure of literary historical notes.

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Vaikhanasa-Grihya-Sutram

Vaikhanasa Srauta Sutram

Vaikhānasa is one of the principal traditions of Hinduism and primarily worships Vishnu (and his associated Avatars) as the Supreme God. The followers are mainly Brahmins of Krishna Yajurveda Taittiriya Shakha and Vaikhanasa Kalpasutra. The name Vaikhānasa stands for the followers and the fundamental philosophy itself with the name derived from founder, Sage Vaikhanasa. It is principally monotheistic in its philosophy, whilst also incorporating elements which could be described as being panentheistic. Vaikhanansas principle focuses on rituals and worship of Lord Vishnu rather than the philosophy of Uttara Mimamsa, unlike Vaishnavism, the larger and more prevalent form on Vishnu worship.

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Vaitana-Sutra

Vaitana sutra

This is an Atharvadeva sutram. Though it contains many interesting matters not found in other ritual works, it cannot claim a great antiquity. The whole Atharva veda literature bears the stamp of a later period than that of the corresponding works of the other Vedas and the Vaitana Sutram especially presupposes the Atharva Grihya, the so called KAusika Sutra.

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Holy-Geeta-by-Swami-Chinmayananda

Holy Geeta
by Swami Chinmayananda

If the Upanishads are the text-books of philosophical principles discussing man, world and God, the Geeta is a hand-book of instructions as to how every human being can come to live the subtle philosophical principles of Vedanta in the actual work-a-day world. Srimad Bhagawad Geeta, the Divine Song of the Lord, occurs in the Bhishma Parva of the Mahabharata, and comprises eighteen chapters, from the 25th to the 42nd. This great hand-book of practical living marked a positive revolution in Hinduism and inaugurated a Hindu renaissance for the ages that followed the Puranic Era. In the Song of the Lord, the Geeta, the Poet-Seer Vyasa has brought the Vedic truths from the sequestered Himalayan caves into the active fields of political life and into the confusing tensions of an imminent fratricidal war.

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Mahabharat-Rajgopalachari

Mahabharata
by C Rajagopalachari

This book is an abridged English retelling of Vyasa’s Mahabharata. Rajaji considered this book and his Ramayana to be his greatest service to his countrymen.

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Mahabharata Of Vyasa English Translation
By K M Ganguli

This is the comprehensive Ganguli translation of the Mahabharata, which was produced by sacred-texts in collaboration with Distributed Proofing.

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Mahabharata full with Geeta in Hindi

This is the entire Mahabharata with the Gita and all its chapters translated in Hindi.

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Ramayana
By C Rajagopalachari

The Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan has added to the debt of gratitude owed it by undertaking the publication of the English version of my Tamil Ramayana. They achieved great success in the distribution of my Mahabharata book and I trust this book of the story of Rama and Sita will receive similar welcome.
Once again, I repeat my confession that in the evening of my busy life during a great and eventful period of Indian history, the writing of these two books wherein I have retold the Mahabharata and Ramayana, is, in my opinion, the best service I have rendered to my people.

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Shrimad Valmiki Ramayana all kand in Hindi

The Ramayana is one of the largest ancient epics in world literature. It consists of nearly 24,000 verses (mostly set in the Shloka meter), divided into seven Kandas (books) and about 500 sargas (chapters). In Hindu tradition, it is considered to be the adi-kavya (first poem). It depicts the duties of relationships, portraying ideal characters like the ideal father, the ideal servant, the ideal brother, the ideal wife and the ideal king. The Ramayana was an important influence on later Sanskrit poetry and Hindu life and culture. Like the Mahabharata, the Ramayana is not just a story: it presents the teachings of ancient Hindu sages in narrative allegory, interspersing philosophical and ethical elements.

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Sri Ram Charit Manas Hindi Text English Translation
By Tulsidas

This is an epic poem in the Awadhi dialect of Hindi, composed by the 16th-century Indian bhakti poet Goswami Tulsidas (c.1532–1623). Ramcharitmanas literally means “”Lake of the deeds of Rama””.Ramcharitmanas is considered as one of the greatest works of Hindi literature. The work has variously been acclaimed as “”the living sum of Indian culture””, “”the tallest tree in the magic garden of medieval Indian poetry””, “”the greatest book of all devotional literature”” and “”the best and most trustworthy guide to the popular living faith of the Indian people.

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Tulsidas Ramayan in English
by Adalut Khan

The Ramayana is indeed a delightful book for Indians to read but difficult for the foreigners. Unaccustomed to the manners and customs of the oriental life, a stranger is generally disgusted with the varied forms of etiquette displayed by the dramatis personae and considers the poet’s sweet verses and his manly sentiments to be slovenly rough and childish. To obviate this difficulty, I have in this translation rendered the verses into simple and clear English, inserted many historical references, corrected several philosophical irregularities and placed some of the verses in their natural order so as to make the sense more lucid.

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18-maha-puranas-in-english

18 Maha Puranas in English

The word Puranas (Sanskrit: पुराण, purāṇa, /pʊˈrɑːnəz/) literally means “”ancient, old””, and it is a vast genre of Indian literature about a wide range of topics, particularly myths, legends and other traditional lore. Composed primarily in Sanskrit, but also in regional languages, several of these texts are named after major Hindu deities such as Vishnu, Shiva and Devi.The Puranas genre of literature is found in both Hinduism and Jainism.

The Puranic literature is encyclopedic, and it includes diverse topics such as cosmogony, cosmology, genealogies of gods, goddesses, kings, heroes, sages, and demigods, folk tales, pilgrimages, temples, medicine, astronomy, grammar, mineralogy, humor, love stories, as well as theology and philosophy.

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Agni-Puran

Agni Puran

Agni Puran is a Sanskrit text and one of the eighteen major Puranas of Hinduism. The text is variously classified as a Purana related to Shaivism, Vaishnavism, Shaktism and Smartism, but also considered as a text that covers them all impartially without leaning towards a particular theology.The range of topics covered by this text include cosmology, mythology, genealogy, politics, education system, iconography, taxation theories, organization of army, theories on proper causes for war, martial arts, diplomacy, local laws, building public projects, water distribution methods, trees and plants, medicine, design and architecture, gemology, grammar, metrics, poetry, food and agriculture, rituals, geography and travel guide to Mithila (Bihar and neighboring states), cultural history, and numerous other topics.

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Markadeya-Puran

Markandeya Purana

The Markandeya Purana (मार्कण्डेय पुराण, IAST: Mārkaṇḍeya Purāṇa) is a Sanskrit text of Hinduism, and one of the eighteen major Puranas. The text’s title Markandeya refers to a sage in Hindu mythology, who is the central character in two legends, one linked to Shiva and other to Vishnu.The Markandeya text is one of the Puranas that lacks a sectarian presentation of ideas in favor of any particular god, and it is rare to read any deity being invoked or deity prayers in the entire text.

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Bhavishya-Puran

Bhavishya Puran

The Bhavishya Purana (Bhaviṣya Purāṇa) is one of the eighteen major Puranas genre of Sanskrit literature in Hinduism.[1][2] The title Bhavishya means “future” and implies it is a work that contains prophecies regarding the future, however, the “prophecy” parts of the extant manuscripts are a modern era work.[3][4] Those sections of the surviving manuscripts that are dated to be older, are partly borrowed from other Indian texts such as Brihat Samhita and Shamba Purana.

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Brahmanda-Puran

Brahmanda Puran

The Brahmanda Purana (Sanskrit: ब्रह्माण्ड पुराण, Brahmāṇḍa Purāṇa) is a Sanskrit text and one of the eighteen major Puranas, a genre of Hindu texts.[1] It is listed as the eighteenth Maha-Purana in almost all the anthologies.[2] The text is also referred in medieval Indian literature as the Vayaviya Purana or Vayaviya Brahmanda, and it may have been same as the Vayu Purana before these texts developed into two overlapping compositions. The Brahmanda Purana is notable for including the Lalita Sahasranamam (a stotra praising Goddess as the supreme being in the universe), and being one of the early Hindu texts found in Bali, Indonesia, also called the Javanese-Brahmanda.[7][8] The text is also notable for the Adhyatma-ramayana, the most important embedded set of chapters in the text, which philosophically attempts to reconcile Bhakti in god Rama and Shaktism with Advaita Vedanta, over 65 chapters and 4,500 verses.

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Bramha-Puran

Brahma Puran

The Brahma Purana (Sanskrit: ब्रह्म पुराण, Brahma Purāņa) is one of the eighteen major Puranas genre of Hindu texts in Sanskrit language. It is listed as the first Maha-Purana in all the anthologies, and therefore also called Adi Purana. Another title for this text is Saura Purana, because it includes many chapters related to Surya or the Sun god. The name Brahma Purana is misleading and apocryphal because the extant manuscripts of this text have nothing to do with the Hindu god Brahma, and are actually just a compilation of geographical Mahatmya (travel guides) and sections on diverse topics. The text is notable for dedicating over 60% of its chapters on description of geography and holy sites of Godavari river region, as well as places in and around modern Odisha, and tributaries of Chambal river in Rajasthan. This travel guide-like sections are non-sectarian, and celebrates sites and temples related to Vishnu, Shiva, Devi and Surya.

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Garuda-puran

Garuda Puran

The Garuda Purana is one of eighteen Mahāpurāṇa genre of texts in Hinduism. It is a part of Vaishnavism literature corpus, primarily centering around Hindu god Vishnu but praises all gods. Composed in Sanskrit, the earliest version of the text may have been composed in the 1st millennium CE, but it was likely expanded and changed over a long period of time.

The Garuda Purana text is known in many versions, containing between 8,000 to 19,000 verses. Its chapters encyclopedically deal with highly diverse collection of topics. The text contains cosmology, mythology, relationship between gods, ethics, good versus evil, various schools of Hindu philosophies, the theory of Yoga, the theory of “”heaven and hell”” with “”karma and rebirth””, ancestral rites and soteriology, rivers and geography, types of minerals and stones, testing methods for gems for their quality, listing of plants and herbs,[8] various diseases and their symptoms, various medicines, aphrodisiacs, prophylactics, Hindu calendar and its basis, astronomy, moon, planets, astrology, architecture, building home, essential features of a Hindu temple, rites of passage, charity and gift making, economy, thrift, duties of a king, politics, state officials and their roles and how to appointment them, genre of literature, rules of grammar, and other topics. The final chapters discuss how to practice Yoga (Samkhya and Advaita types), personal development and the benefits of self-knowledge.

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Kalki-Puran

Kalki Puran

The Kalki Purana (Sanskrit: कल्कि पुराण Kalki purāṇa) is a prophetic work in Sanskrit that details the life and times of Kalki, the tenth and final of the Dashavatara (the ten Avatars) of the Hindu deity Lord Vishnu. The narrative is set in near the end of the Kali Yuga or Dark Age, as revealed by the storyteller Suta.

The extant text comprises three aṃśas (sections) consisting 7, 7 and 21 chapters respectively.[1] Although it is considered an Upapurana or ‘Lesser Purana’, it is derived from passages taken directly from the 18 ‘Major’ Puranas, including the Vishnu Purana and the Bhagavata Purana ascribed to Vyasa. It is believed that the Kalki Purana existed prior to the 16th century CE as parts of it were referenced to in the Avadhi.

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kapila-purana

Kapila Puran

The Kapila Purana (Sanskrit: कपिल पुराण, Kapila Purāṇa) (ca. 11th century) is a Hindu religious text. The text is considered as one of the 18 Upapuranas. It contains 21 chapters which mostly narrate glories about the puņyakṣetras (sacred places) of Utkala. It subsequently describes the greatness of Purusottama Kshetra, Viraja Kshetra, Maiterya Vana, and Ekamra Tirtha. Sage Kapila is the main narrator of this Purana. He describes to king Shalyajit regarding the glorified virtue of Utkala Kingdom, which he reports as a conversation between sage Bharadvaja and the sages performing tapas (austerities) in Pushkarakshetra.[1] It describes the Shiva, Durga, Vishnu and Surya shrines in and around Orissa. The Jnana yoga is described in the final chapter of this Purana.

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Narsimha-Puran

Narsimha Puran

Narasimha Purana (Narasiṁha Purāṇa) (Sanskrit:नरसिंह पुराण) is one of the Upapuranas. R.C. Hazra in his Studies in the Upapuranas came to the conclusion that the original text was written in the later part of the 5th century, though several portions of it were added much later. This work was translated into Telugu about 1300. The recension presented by the printed editions of the text has 68 chapters. The 8th chapter of the text is one of the three versions of the Yama Gītā (other two versions are the Vishnu Purana, Book 3, ch.1-7 and the Agni Purana, Book 3, ch.381). The chapters 36-54 consist the narratives of the ten Avatars of Vishnu. Chapter 21 and 22 contain the short genealogical lists of the kings of the Surya Vamsha (Solar dynasty) and the Soma Vamsha (Lunar dynasty), the former ending with Buddha, son of Shuddhoana and the latter with Kshemaka, grandson of Udayana. Chapters 57-61 of this work is also found as an independent work, the Harita Samhita or Laghuharita Smriti.

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Kurma-Puran

Kurma Puran

The Kurma Purana (IAST: KūrmaPurāṇa) is one of the eighteen Mahapuranas, and a medieval era Vaishnavism text of Hinduism.The text is named after the tortoise avatar of Vishnu.

The manuscripts of Kurma Purana have survived into the modern era in many versions. The number of chapters vary with regional manuscripts, and the critical edition of the Kurma Purana has 95 chapters. Tradition believes that the Kurma Purana text had 17,000 verses, the extant manuscripts have about 6,000 verses.

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Ling-Purana

Ling Purana

The Linga Purana (लिंग पुराण, IAST: Liṅga Purāṇa) one of the eighteen Mahapuranas, and a Shaivism text of Hinduism.[1][2] The text’s title Linga refers to the iconography for Shiva. The text presents cosmology, mythology, seasons, festivals, geography, a tour guide for pilgrimage (Tirtha), a manual for the design and consecration of the Linga and Nandi, stotras, the importance of these icons, a description of Yoga with claims of its various benefits.

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Matsya-Puran-1

Matsya Puran – 1

The Matsya Purana is also notable for being encyclopedic in the topics it covers. Along with the five topics the text defines a Purana to be, it includes mythology, a guide for building art work such as paintings and sculpture, features and design guidelines for temples, objects and house architecture (Vastu-shastra), various types of Yoga, duties and ethics (Dharma) with multiple chapters on the value of Dāna (charity), both Shiva and Vishnu related festivals, geography particularly around the Narmada river, pilgrimage, duties of a king and good government and other topics.

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Matsya-Puran-2

Matsya Puran – 2

The Matsya Purana is also notable for being encyclopedic in the topics it covers. Along with the five topics the text defines a Purana to be, it includes mythology, a guide for building art work such as paintings and sculpture, features and design guidelines for temples, objects and house architecture (Vastu-shastra), various types of Yoga, duties and ethics (Dharma) with multiple chapters on the value of Dāna (charity), both Shiva and Vishnu related festivals, geography particularly around the Narmada river, pilgrimage, duties of a king and good government and other topics.

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Nandi-Puran

Nandi puran

Nandi is the name for the bull which serves as the mount (Sanskrit: Vahana) of the god Shiva and as the gatekeeper of Shiva and Parvati. In Hindu Religion, he is the chief guru of eighteen masters (18 Siddhar) including Patanjali and Thirumular.Temples venerating Shiva display stone images of a seated Nandi, generally facing the main shrine. There are also a number of temples dedicated solely to Nandi.

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Narad-Puran

Narad Puran

The Narada Purana (also Naradiya Purana) follows the style of the Brihannaradiya Purana in the first 41 chapters of Purvabhaga, but the rest of the first part and second part are encyclopedic covering a diverse range of topics. The encyclopedic sections discuss subjects such as the six Vedangas, Moksha, Dharma, Adhyatma-jnana (monastic life), Pashupata philosophy, a secular guide with methods of worship of Ganesha, various avatars of Vishnu (Mahavisnu, Nrisimha, Hayagriva, Rama, Krishna), Lakshmana, Hanuman, goddesses such as Devi and Mahalakshmi, as well as Shiva. The text glorifies Radha as the one whose soul and love manifests as all Hindu goddesses.

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Padam-Puran

Padma Puran

Padma puran is an encyclopedic text, named after the lotus in which creator god Brahma appeared, and includes large sections dedicated to Vishnu, as well significant sections on Shiva and Shakti. The text includes sections on cosmology, mythology, genealogy, geography, rivers and seasons, temples and pilgrimage to numerous sites in India – notably to the Brahma temple in Pushkar Rajasthan, versions of story of Rama and Sita different than one found in Valmiki’s Ramayana, festivals, glorification mainly of Vishnu but also in parts of Shiva and their worship, discussions on ethics and guest hospitality, Yoga, theosophical discussion on Atman (soul), Advaita, Moksha and other topics.

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Parashara-Puran

Parshara puran

Parshara was a maharishi and the author of many ancient Indian texts. He is accredited as the author of the first Purana, the Vishnu Purana, before his son Vyasa wrote it in its present form. He was the grandson of Vasishtha, the son of Śakti Maharṣi, and the father of Vyasa. There are several texts which give reference to Parashara as an author/speaker. Modern scholars believe that there were many individuals who used this name throughout time whereas others assert that the same Parashara taught these various texts and the time of writing them varied. The actual sage himself never wrote the texts, he was known as a traveling teacher, and the various texts attributed to him are given in reference to Parashara being the speaker to his student.

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Samba-Puran

Samba Puran

The Samba Purana (Sanskrit: साम्ब पुराण, Sāmba Purāṇa) is one of the Saura Upapuranas. This text is dedicated to Surya. The recension of the text found in the printed editions[1] has 84 chapters. Chapters 53-68 of this text are also divided into 15 Paṭalas. After the customary beginning in Chapter 1, the text consists the narrative of Krishna’s son Samba’s getting infected by leprosy, after being cursed by his father and consequently getting cured by worshipping Surya in the temple constructed by him in Mitravana on the banks of the Chandrabhaga. The whole narrative is presented as a conversation between the king Brihadbala of Ikshvaku dynasty and the sage Vashishtha. Chapters 26-27 of this text narrate the story of bringing the eighteen Maga Brahmins from Śākadvīpa by Samba and appointing them as the priests of the Surya temple in Mitravana.

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Shiv-Puran

Shiv Purana

Sage Shaunak expressed his desire to Sutji about knowing the means, which could help a man in this era of Kali to attainment lord Shiva, by cleansing all the impurities of his mind and rectifying his inherent demonic tendencies. Sutji then described about Shiv Mahapuran – the supreme of all the puranas, which was narrated by Lord Shiva himself and which was later on retold by Sage Vyas with the permission of Maharshi Sanatkumar, for the benediction of common man. Sutji said, “By understanding the mysteries of Shivmahapuran and singing its praises, a man attains greater virtues than that which could be attained by being charitable or by the performance of all the `yagyas’. Contemplating on the subject matters of Shivmahapuran give auspicious fruits just like a ‘Kalpa-taru’ (A mythological tree which fulfills all the wishes). Shiv Mahapuran contains twenty-four thousand shlokas and seven.

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Shri-Shiva-Rahasya

Shri Shiva Rahasya

Shivarahasya Purana (Sanskrit: शिव रहस्य पुराण; IAST: śiva rahasya purāṇa) is one of the ‘Shaiva Upapuranas’ or ancillary Purana regarding Shiva and Shaivite worship and is also considered ‘Indian epic poetry’ . The book is dedicated to detailed explanation of Shaivite thoughts, rituals and religious myths.

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Skand-Puran

Skanda Puran

Skanda puran is the largest Mahāpurāṇa, a genre of eighteen Hindu religious texts.The text contains over 81,000 verses, and is part of Shaivite literature, titled after Skanda, a son of Shiva and Parvati, who is also known as Kartikeya and Murugan. While the text is named after Skanda, he does not feature either more or less prominently in this text than in other Shiva-related Puranas.The text has been an important historical record and influence on the Hindu traditions related to war-god Skanda.

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Srimad-Devi-Purana

Srimad Devi Puran

The text consists of twelve Skandha (sections) with 318 chapters. Along with Devi Mahatmya, it is one of the most important works in Shaktism, a tradition within Hinduism that reveres Devi or Shakti (Goddess) as the primordial creator of the universe and the Brahman (ultimate truth and reality). It celebrates the divine feminine as the origin of all existence, the creator, the preserver and the destroyer of everything, as well as the one who empowers spiritual liberation. While all major Puranas of Hinduism mention and revere the Goddess, this text centers around her as the primary divinity. The underlying philosophy of this text is Advaita Vedanta-style monism combined with devotional worship of Shakti (feminine power).

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Brahma-Vaivarta-Puran

Brahma Vaivarta Puran

The text is notable for identifying Krishna as the supreme Reality and asserting that all gods such as Vishnu, Shiva, Brahma, Ganesha are same, and all are incarnations of Krishna.[6] All goddesses such as Radha, Durga, Lakshmi, Saraswati, Savitri are also asserted by the Brahmavaivarta Purana to be equivalent and all incarnations of Prakriti (nature), with legends similar to those found in the Mahabharata and the Devi Mahatmya.[7] The text is also notable for glorifying the feminine through Radha and its egalitarian views that all women are manifestations of the divine female, co-creators of the universe, and that any insult to a woman is an insult to goddess Radha.

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Vaman-Puran

Vaman Puran

Vaman Puan is named after one of the incarnations of Vishnu and probably was a Vaishnavism text in its origin. However, the modern surviving manuscripts of Vamana Purana are more strongly centered on Shiva, while containing chapters that revere VIshnu and other Hindu gods and goddesses. It is considered a Shaivism text.

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Varaha-Puran

Varaha Puran

The Varaha Purana (Sanskrit: वराह पुराण, Varāha Purāṇa) is a Sanskrit text from the Puranas genre of literature in Hinduism.It belongs to the Vaishnavism literature corpus praising Narayana (Vishnu), but includes chapters dedicated to praising and centered on Shiva and Shakti (goddesses it calls Brahmi, Vaishnavi and Raudri).

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Vayu-Puran

Vayu Puran

The Vayu Purana, according to the tradition and verses in other Puranas, contains 24,000 verses (shlokas).[8] However, the surviving manuscripts have about 12,000 verses.[9] The text was continuously revised over the centuries, and its extant manuscripts are very different.[10] Some manuscripts have four padas (parts) with 112 chapters, and some two khandas with 111 chapters.

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Vishnu-Puran

Vishnu Puran

The Vishnu Purana presents its contents in Pancalaksana format – Sarga (cosmogony), Pratisarga (cosmology), Vamśa (mythical genealogy of the gods, sages and kings), Manvañtara (cosmic cycles), and Vamśānucaritam (legends during the times of various kings).Some manuscripts of the text are notable for not including sections found in other major Puranas, such as those on Mahatmyas and tour guides on pilgrimage,[9] but some versions include chapters on temples and travel guides to sacred pilgrimage sites.

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Agama-and-South-Indian-Vaishnavism

Agama and South Indian Vaishnavism
By V Varadhachari

The author starts with the giddy and dim heights of the Vedic religions and advances methodically to the delineation of recent Hindu philosophy and religion which are dominated by the Agamas. The recent Hinduism is Agamic in character whether it be Sakta Saiva or Vaisanava. Not that the hoary heritage of the Vedas, Upanishads, the Epics, Puranas and Smritis is discarded but it is subsumed and concretized in the living traditions of practical Hinduism. Our author takes the treatment to further particularization of the South Indian Vaisnavism.

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Kamika-Agama-Poorva-Pada-Part-1

Kamika Agama Poorva Pada

First section of the Kamika Agama, a principle Saiva Agama. Kamika is a primary source for details of personal worship, temple construction, dedication and worship and many aspects of home and village design. English translation by Dr. S.P. Sabharathanam Sivacharya with original devanagiri and transliteration. C

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Kamika-Agama-Poorva-Pada-Part-2

Kamika Agama Uttara Pada
Second section (through chapter 63) of the Kamika Agama, a principle Saiva Agama. Kamika is a primary source for details of personal worship, initiation, deity installation, temple construction, dedication and worship and many aspects of home and village design. English translation by Dr. S.P. Sabharathanam Sivacharya with original devanagiri and transliteration.
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Matanga-Agama-Vidya-Pada

Matanga Agama

Matanga Agama, Vida Pada, or section on knowledge translated into English by Dr. S.P. Sabharathnam Sivacharyar. This is an agama of very deep philosophy on the nature of Siva and of liberation. Includes chapters one to four.

Mantanga Agama, Vidya Pada
1) Introductory Chapter on the Content of the Text
2) A Brief Summary of the Contents of this Agama
3) Ruminations on the Nature of Two Tattvas – Laya and Bhoga
4) The Nature of Adhikara Tattva (Sadasiva Tattva)
5) Reflections on the Nature of Sakti
6) Detailed Analysis of the Nature of Soul, Bonds and Isvara.

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Sarvajnanottara-Agama

Sarvajnanottara Agama

Sarvajnanottara Agama Vidya and Yoga Pada or section translated to English by Dr. S.P. Sabharathanam Sivacharyar. One of the most important Saiva Agamas. Subjects include the “direct blissful experience of absolute oneness with Siva,” the nature of the physical self, inner self, self associated with tattvas, self in the form of mantra and the nature of the Supreme Self.

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Studies-on-the-Tantras-by-Ramakrishna-Mission

Studies on the Tantras
by Ramakrishna Mission

There is not much authentic literature about Tantra in the market today. No wonder there are many misconceptions about this great and useful science of religion. This book, a compilation of articles written by recognized scholars, may help remove some of these misconceptions.

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Raurava-Agama

Raurava Agama

Raurava Agama Vidya Pada or knowledge section translated to English by Dr. S.P. Sabharathnam Sivacharyar. Subjects include Siva tattvas, transmission of scriptures, metaphysical path, mudras, breathing, yoga, initiation, instructions to the dying sadhaka and meaning of vyoma vyapi mantra.

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Pauskar-Agama

Pauskar Agama

Pauskara Agama, Vidya Pada or Knowledge section, translated to English by Dr. S.P. Sabharathnam Sivacharyar. A deep philosophic section dealing with the nature of Siva, Maya, the bound soul, time, tattvas, ahankara, subtle and gross elements, “means of valid and true knowledge” and the nature of the Agamas.

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Mrgendra-Agama

Mrgendra Agama

Mrgendra Agama, Vidya Pada or knowledge section, translated to English by Dr. S.P. Sabharathnam. The knowledge sections of the agamas are very dense philosophically, this one dealing with, just for example, “An Analysis of the Essential Nature of the Supreme Lord” in chapter five.

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Atma-bodha-knowledge-of-self

Aatma Bodha Knowledge of self
by Adi Sankaracharya

This is a short Sanskrit text attributed to Adi Shankara of Advaita Vedanta school of Hindu philosophy. The text in sixty-eight verses describes the path to Self-knowledge or the awareness of Atman.The Vedanta tradition states that the text was written by Shankara for his disciple, Sanandana, also known as Padmapāda. However, recent scholarship doubts that the text was written by Shankara.

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Advait-Vedanta-for-Beginners-by-D-Krishna-Ayyar

Advait Vedanta for Beginners
by D Krishna Ayyar

We all ask questions regarding ourselves, the world and the Lord, such as – Who am I? Am I the body? Am I the mind? What happens to us when we die? What is the nature of the world that we see? How did it come? Will it have an end? Is there a Creator? Is there some one like a Supreme Lord? Is there more than one God? What is our relationship to others, the world and the Lord or the Gods? What is the purpose of life? Like other philosophies, Advaita Vedanta deals with such questions. It is a unique philosophy. The uniqueness consists in (a) the assertion of the identity of a supreme principle of existence cum consciousness cum infinity and the individual consciousness and (b) the relegation of the universe to a lower order of reality.

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Aparoksha-Anubhuti-by-Sri-Shankaracharya

Aparoksha anubhuti
by Sri Shankaracharya

This is a famous work attributed to Adi Shankara. It is a popular introductory work that expounds Advaita Vedanta philosophy. It describes a method that seekers can follow to directly experience the essential truth of one’s one nature. Thus, the work is literally titled Aparokshanubhuti, or Direct Experience. Swami Vimuktananda titles his translation Self-Realization.

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Asthadhyayi-vol-1-by-Panini

Asthadhyayi vol 1
by Panini

ASHTADHYAYI, Sanskrit Astadhyayi ( “” Eight Chapters “” ) , Sanskrit treatise on grammar written in the 6th to 5th century bce by the Indian grammarian Panini. This work set the linguistic standards for Classical Sanskrit. It sums up in 4000 sutras the science of phonetics and grammar that had evolved in the Vedic religion . Panini divided the work into eight chapters , each of which is further divided into quarter chapters .Beyond defining the morphology and syntax of Sanskrit language , Ashtadhyayi distinguishes between usage in the spoken language and usage that is proper to the language of the sacred texts. The Ashtadhyayi is generative as well as descriptive. With its complex use of metarules , transformations , and recursions , the grammar in Ashtadhyayi has been likened to the Turing machine , an idealized mathematical model that reduces the logical structure of any computing device to its essentials .

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Asthadhyayi-vol-2-by-Panini

Asthadhyayi vol 2
by Panini

Pāṇini is known for his Sanskrit grammar, particularly for his formulation of the 3,959 rules of Sanskrit morphology, syntax and semantics in the grammar known as Aṣṭādhyāyī (meaning “eight chapters”), the foundational text of the grammatical branch of the Vedanga, the auxiliary scholarly disciplines of the historical Vedic religion. He can be considered as the father of linguistics.

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Asthadhyayi-vol-3-by-Panini

Asthadhyayi vol 3
by Panini

Pāṇini is known for his Sanskrit grammar, particularly for his formulation of the 3,959 rules of Sanskrit morphology, syntax and semantics in the grammar known as Aṣṭādhyāyī (meaning “eight chapters”), the foundational text of the grammatical branch of the Vedanga, the auxiliary scholarly disciplines of the historical Vedic religion. He can be considered as the father of linguistics.

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Asthadhyayi-vol-5-by-Panini

Asthadhyayi vol 5
by Panini

Pāṇini is known for his Sanskrit grammar, particularly for his formulation of the 3,959 rules of Sanskrit morphology, syntax and semantics in the grammar known as Aṣṭādhyāyī (meaning “”eight chapters””), the foundational text of the grammatical branch of the Vedanga, the auxiliary scholarly disciplines of the historical Vedic religion. He can be considered as the father of linguistics.

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Asthadhyayi-vol-6-by-Panini

Asthadhyayi vol 6
by Panini

Pāṇini is known for his Sanskrit grammar, particularly for his formulation of the 3,959 rules of Sanskrit morphology, syntax and semantics in the grammar known as Aṣṭādhyāyī (meaning “”eight chapters””), the foundational text of the grammatical branch of the Vedanga, the auxiliary scholarly disciplines of the historical Vedic religion. He can be considered as the father of linguistics.

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Asthadhyayi-vol-7-by-Panini

Asthadhyayi vol 7
by Panini

Pāṇini is known for his Sanskrit grammar, particularly for his formulation of the 3,959 rules of Sanskrit morphology, syntax and semantics in the grammar known as Aṣṭādhyāyī (meaning “”eight chapters””), the foundational text of the grammatical branch of the Vedanga, the auxiliary scholarly disciplines of the historical Vedic religion. He can be considered as the father of linguistics.

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Asthadhyayi-vol-8-by-Panini

Asthadhyayi vol 8
by Panini

Pāṇini is known for his Sanskrit grammar, particularly for his formulation of the 3,959 rules of Sanskrit morphology, syntax and semantics in the grammar known as Aṣṭādhyāyī (meaning “”eight chapters””), the foundational text of the grammatical branch of the Vedanga, the auxiliary scholarly disciplines of the historical Vedic religion. He can be considered as the father of linguistics.

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Bauddha-Praman-Darshan-Ambika-Dutta-Sharma

Bauddha Praman Darshan
By Ambika Dutta Sharma

These are darsanas pertaining to the Buddha.

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Carvaka-Darsana

Carvaka Darsana

Carvaka is the ancient school of Indian materialism. Charvaka holds direct perception, empiricism, and conditional inference as proper sources of knowledge, embraces philosophical skepticism and rejects Vedas, Vedic ritualism and supernaturalism. Charvaka is categorized as a heterodox school of Indian philosophy.It is considered an example of atheistic schools in the Hindu tradition.

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Pasupata-sutra-by-Nakulesa

Pasupata sutra
by Nakulesa

This is the oldest of the major Shaivite Hindu schools.The philosophy of the Pashupata sect was systematized by Lakulish (also called Nakuliśa) in the 2nd century A.D. The main texts of the school are Gaṇakārikā, Pañchārtha bhāshyadipikā and Rāśikara-bhāshya. Pashupata Shaivism was a devotional (bhakti) and ascetic movement.

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Apastamba Dharma Grihya Sutras

“The Apastambīya Dharma-sūtra forms part of an enormous Kalpa-sūtra or body of aphorisms, which deals with the teaching of the Veda and of the ancient Rishis regarding the performance of sacrifices and the duties of the twice-born, and which, being chiefly based on the second of the four Vedas, the Yajur-veda in the Taittirīya recension, is primarily intended for the benefit of the Adhvaryu priests in whose families the study of the Yajur-veda is hereditary.
The entire Kalpa-sūtra of Āpastamba is divided into 30 sections, called Praśnas, literally questions.

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Baudhayana Dharma Sutra

The Baudhayana sūtras are a group of Vedic Sanskrit texts which cover dharma, daily ritual, mathematics, etc. They belong to the Taittiriya branch of the Krishna Yajurveda school and are among the earliest texts of the sutra genre, perhaps compiled in the 8th to 7th centuries BCE.

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Brihaspati-Sutram

Brihaspati Sutram

The science of politics according to the school of sage Brihaspati.

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Hiranyakeshi Dharma Sutra

Hiranyakeshi Dharmasutra belongs to the Taittiriya Shaka of Krishna Yajurveda. It is part of Hiranyakeshi Kalpa. It is a textbook on rules of conduct and religious and civil law. The text is credited to Satyasadha Hiranyakeshi and is believed to have been composed during 2nd century AD. The text is concerned with the rules, duties and responsibilities about the conduct of the people as the members of a family, society or a kingdom. It also deals with marriage, sacraments, brahmacharin, etc.

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Gautama-Dharmashastra

Gautama Dharma Sutra

Gautama Dharmasūtra is a Sanskrit text and likely one of the oldest Hindu Dharmasutras (600-200 BCE), whose manuscripts have survived into the modern age. The text is divided into 28 Adhyayas (chapters),with cumulative total of 973 verses all related to judicial procedures.

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History-Of-Dharmashastras-vol-1-P-V-Kane

History Of Dharmashastras vol 1
By P V Kane

The History of Dharmaśāstra, with subtitle Ancient and Medieval Religious and Civil Law in India, is a monumental five-volume work consisting of around 6,500 pages. It was written by Pandurang Vaman Kane, an Indologist. The first volume of the work was published in 1930 and the last one in 1962. The work is considered Kane’s magnum opus in English.This work researched the evolution of code of conduct in ancient and mediaeval India by looking into several texts and manuscripts compiled over the centuries. Dr Kane used the resources available at prestigious institutes such as the Asiatic Society of Mumbai and Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, among others. The work is known for its expanse and depth – ranging across diverse subjects such as the Mahabharata, the Puranas and Chanakya – including references to previously obscure sources. The richness in the work is attributed to his in-depth knowledge of Sanskrit. His success is believed to be an outcome of his objective study of the texts instead of deifying them.

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History Of Dharmashastras vol 2
By P V Kane

The History of Dharmaśāstra, with subtitle Ancient and Medieval Religious and Civil Law in India, is a monumental five-volume work consisting of around 6,500 pages. It was written by Pandurang Vaman Kane, an Indologist. The first volume of the work was published in 1930 and the last one in 1962. The work is considered Kane’s magnum opus in English.This work researched the evolution of code of conduct in ancient and mediaeval India by looking into several texts and manuscripts compiled over the centuries. Dr Kane used the resources available at prestigious institutes such as the Asiatic Society of Mumbai and Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, among others. The work is known for its expanse and depth – ranging across diverse subjects such as the Mahabharata, the Puranas and Chanakya – including references to previously obscure sources. The richness in the work is attributed to his in-depth knowledge of Sanskrit. His success is believed to be an outcome of his objective study of the texts instead of deifying them.

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History Of Dharmashastras vol 3
By P V Kane

The History of Dharmaśāstra, with subtitle Ancient and Medieval Religious and Civil Law in India, is a monumental five-volume work consisting of around 6,500 pages. It was written by Pandurang Vaman Kane, an Indologist. The first volume of the work was published in 1930 and the last one in 1962. The work is considered Kane’s magnum opus in English.This work researched the evolution of code of conduct in ancient and mediaeval India by looking into several texts and manuscripts compiled over the centuries. Dr Kane used the resources available at prestigious institutes such as the Asiatic Society of Mumbai and Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, among others. The work is known for its expanse and depth – ranging across diverse subjects such as the Mahabharata, the Puranas and Chanakya – including references to previously obscure sources. The richness in the work is attributed to his in-depth knowledge of Sanskrit. His success is believed to be an outcome of his objective study of the texts instead of deifying them.

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History Of Dharmashastras vol 4
By P V Kane

The History of Dharmaśāstra, with subtitle Ancient and Medieval Religious and Civil Law in India, is a monumental five-volume work consisting of around 6,500 pages. It was written by Pandurang Vaman Kane, an Indologist. The first volume of the work was published in 1930 and the last one in 1962. The work is considered Kane’s magnum opus in English.This work researched the evolution of code of conduct in ancient and mediaeval India by looking into several texts and manuscripts compiled over the centuries. Dr Kane used the resources available at prestigious institutes such as the Asiatic Society of Mumbai and Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, among others. The work is known for its expanse and depth – ranging across diverse subjects such as the Mahabharata, the Puranas and Chanakya – including references to previously obscure sources. The richness in the work is attributed to his in-depth knowledge of Sanskrit. His success is believed to be an outcome of his objective study of the texts instead of deifying them.

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History-Of-Dharmashastras-vol-5-P-V-Kane

History Of Dharmashastras vol 5
By P V Kane

The History of Dharmaśāstra, with subtitle Ancient and Medieval Religious and Civil Law in India, is a monumental five-volume work consisting of around 6,500 pages. It was written by Pandurang Vaman Kane, an Indologist. The first volume of the work was published in 1930 and the last one in 1962. The work is considered Kane’s magnum opus in English.This work researched the evolution of code of conduct in ancient and mediaeval India by looking into several texts and manuscripts compiled over the centuries. Dr Kane used the resources available at prestigious institutes such as the Asiatic Society of Mumbai and Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, among others. The work is known for its expanse and depth – ranging across diverse subjects such as the Mahabharata, the Puranas and Chanakya – including references to previously obscure sources. The richness in the work is attributed to his in-depth knowledge of Sanskrit. His success is believed to be an outcome of his objective study of the texts instead of deifying them.

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Manusmriti

Manusmriti

The Manusmṛti (Sanskrit: मनुस्मृति), also spelled as Manusmriti, is an ancient legal text among the many Dharmaśāstras of Hinduism. It was one of the first Sanskrit texts translated during the British rule of India in 1794, by Sir William Jones, and used to formulate the Hindu law by the colonial government. The metrical text is in Sanskrit, is variously dated to be from the 2nd century BCE to 3rd century CE, and it presents itself as a discourse given by Manu and Bhrigu on dharma topics such as duties, rights, laws, conduct, virtues and others.

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Vasishtha Dharma Sutra

The Vashistha Dharmasutra is one of the few surviving ancient Sanskrit Dharmasutras of Hinduism. It is reverentially named after a Rigvedic sage Vashistha who lived in the 2nd millennium BCE, but the text was probably composed by unknown authors between 300 BCE – 100 CE. It forms an independent text and other parts of the Kalpasūtra, that is Shrauta- and Grihya-sutras are missing. Some of the topics discussed in this Dharmasūtra are sources of law, sins, marriage, governance, social classes, rites of passage (birth, menstruation, marriage, cremation), good conduct, orders of life (ashrama), charity and guests, adoption, excommunication and loss of caste, readmission to caste, mixed classes, crimes, murder, adultery, theft, suicide, killing animals, penances, punishment for minor and major crimes, gifts, and others.

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Narada Smriti
Translated by Julius Jolly

Nāradasmṛti is a part of the Dharmaśāstras, an Indian literary tradition that serves as a collection of legal maxims relating to the topic of dharma. This text is purely juridical in character in that it focuses solely on procedural and substantive law. Known as the “”juridical text par excellence,”” the Nāradasmṛti is the only Dharmaśāstra text to not cover areas such as righteous conduct and penance. Its focused nature has made the text highly valued by rulers and their governments, in Indian subcontinent and southeast Asia, likely as an aid of carrying out their dharma of justly ruling the country.

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The Vaimānika Śāstra

“The Vaimānika Śāstra (वैमानिक शास्त्र, lit. “”shastra on the topic of Vimanas””; or “”science of aeronautics””, sometimes also rendered Vimanika, Vymanika, Vyamanika) is an early 20th-century Sanskrit text on aerospace technology. It makes the claim that the vimānas mentioned in ancient Sanskrit epics were advanced aerodynamic flying vehicles.The existence of the text was revealed in 1952 by G. R. Josyer who asserted that it was written by Pandit Subbaraya Shastry (1866–1940), who dictated it during the years 1918–1923. A Hindi translation was published in 1959, while the Sanskrit text with an English translation was published in 1973. It contains 3000 shlokas in 8 chapters which Shastry claimed was psychically delivered to him by the ancient Hindu sage Bharadvaja.The text has gained favor among proponents of ancient astronaut theories.”

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Vaikhānasa Dharma Sutra

Vaikhānasa is one of the principal traditions of Hinduism and primarily worships Vishnu (and his associated Avatars) as the Supreme God. The followers are mainly Brahmins of Krishna Yajurveda Taittiriya Shakha and Vaikhanasa Kalpasutra. The name Vaikhānasa stands for the followers and the fundamental philosophy itself with the name derived from founder, Sage Vaikhanasa. It is principally monotheistic in its philosophy, whilst also incorporating elements which could be described as being panentheistic. Vaikhanansas principle focuses on rituals and worship of Lord Vishnu rather than the philosophy of Uttara Mimamsa, unlike Vaishnavism, the larger and more prevalent form on Vishnu worship.

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Vishnu Smiri translated by Julius Jolly

Vishnu Smriti is one of the latest books of the Dharmaśāstra tradition in Hinduism and the only one which does not deal directly with the means of knowing dharma. The text has a strong bhakti orientation, requiring daily puja to the god Vishnu. It is also known for its handling of the controversial subject of the practice of sati (the burning of a widow on her husband’s funeral pyre). A Banaras pandit, Nadapandita, was the first to write a commentary on the Vishnu Smriti in 1622, but the book was not translated into English until 1880 by Julius Jolly. The Vishnu Smriti is divided into one hundred chapters, consisting mostly of prose text but including one or more verses at the end of each chapter. The premise of the narration is a frame story dialogue between the god Vishnu and the goddess Earth.

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Vishnu Dharma Sutra

This Sanskrit text deals with marriage, inheritance and criminal law.

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Yajnavika-Smriti-Translated-by-Samarao-Narasimha-Naraharayya

Yajnavalkya smriti by Srisa Chandra

“Next to Manu’s institutes of sacred law, the Smriti of Yajnvikya is the most important. It contains lOlOslokas or stanzas ; and is divided into three Adhyyas or books, namely Achdra or ecclesiastical and moral code : Vyavahara or the civil law and Prayaschitta (Penance) or the penal code. There are several well-known commentaries on Ydjiiavalkya’s Institutes : such as by Aparika, Visvarrupa, Vijnauevara, Mitra Misra and Sulapani. But the commentary of Vijiianesvara has superseded their others and under the name of the Mitaksar it is accepted as authoritative by the Hindus of most of the provinces of India.”

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Yajnavika Smriti
Translated by Samarao Narasimha Naraharayya

The Prayaschiitta or Penance is that portion of Hindu Law which is deemed to be of very little importance to the practical lawyer. But a right conception of Hindu Law is not possible without at least a general idea of penances and tiles theory underlying them. This Volume on Praya^- chitta not only deals with penances strictly so called, but with Sraddlias and death-impurity also—a subject whicli a general lawyer should know, if he wants to understand rightly the Law of Inheritance even.

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vimanika shaster

The Vaimānika Śāstra (वैमानिक शास्त्र, lit. “shastra on the topic of Vimanas”; or “science of aeronautics”, sometimes also rendered Vimanika, Vymanika, Vyamanika) is an early 20th-century Sanskrit text on aerospace technology. It makes the claim that the vimānas mentioned in ancient Sanskrit epics were advanced aerodynamic flying vehicles. This is the Sanskrit version with no English translation.

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51-Chalisa-and-Arti-Sangrah

51Chalisa and Arti Sangrah

Chalisa means “forty verse” prayers . Verses that praise and plead with devotion. They are recited over and over again or chanted by groups. The acts and deeds od deities are recalled in these verses to aid the devotee to meditate on righteous and noble qualities. This book provides all the 51 chalisas and a collection of aartis dedicated to various deities.

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All-about-Hinduism-Swami-Shivanand

All about Hinduism
By Swami Shivanand

Hinduism is the religion of the Hindus, a name given to the Universal Religion which hailed supreme in India. It is the oldest of all living religions. This is not founded by any prophet. Buddhism, Christianity and Mohammedanism owe their origin to the prophets. Their dates are fixed. But no such date can be fixed for Hinduism. Hinduism is not born of the teachings of particular prophets. It is not based on a set of dogmas preached by a particular set of teachers. It is free from religious fanaticism.

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Complete-Works-of-Swami-Vivekananda

Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda

“In the four volumes (Now in nine volumes — Ed.) of the works of the Swami Vivekananda which are to compose the present edition, we have what is not only a gospel to the world at large, but also to its own children, the Charter of the Hindu Faith. What Hinduism needed, amidst the general disintegration of the modern era, was a rock where she could lie at anchor, an authoritative utterance in which she might recognize her self. And this was given to her, in these words and writings of the Swami Vivekananda.”

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Hinduism-doctrine-and-way-of-life-by-C-RAJAGOPALACHARI

Hinduism doctrine and way of life
by C. Rajgopalachari

Whether the claim made in the introductory chapter that Vedanta can create a conscience for social obligations is accepted or not, this book will have served its purpose if it gives to those who read it a clear idea of the philosophy of the Hindus and the way of life flowing from it. Hinduism has been the subject of study by quite a number of earnest men from foreign lands. Some, repelled by features of the social structure still in existence among Hindus, have condemned Hindu philosophy itself as worthless. Others have found great and rare things in it, but in trying to give expression to what they admire, they confuse and mystify their readers and leave them skeptical.

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Panchatantra-Sanskrit-Hindi-JP-Mishra

Panchantran in Sanskrit and Hindi
By JP Mishra

The Panchatantra (IAST: Pañcatantra, Sanskrit: पञ्चतन्त्र, ‘Five Sections’) is an ancient Indian collection of interrelated animal fables in verse and prose, arranged within a frame story. The original Sanskrit work, which some scholars believe was composed around the 3rd century BCE, is attributed to Vishnu Sharma. It is based on older oral traditions, including “”animal fables that are as old as we are able to imagine.

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Sacred-books-of-the-east-by-Max-Mueller

Sacred books of the east – Vol 2
by Max Mueller

The Sacred Books of the East (SBE) series, comprising fifty volumes, was issued by the Oxford University Press between 1879 and 1910. It has translations of key sacred texts of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Zoroastrianism, Jainism, and Islam. The series was edited by the famous linguist and scholar of comparative religion, Max Müller. He wrote three of the volumes, and collaborated on three others.

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Savitri-by-Shree-Aurobindo

Savitry
By Shree Aurobindo

Savitri: A Legend and a Symbol is an epic poem in blank verse by Sri Aurobindo, based upon the theology from the Mahabharata. Its central theme revolves around the transcendence of man as the consummation of terrestrial evolution, and the emergence of an immortal supra-mental gnostic race upon earth. Unfinished at Sri Aurobindo’s death, Savitri approaches 24,000 lines.

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Sri-Vishnu-sahasranaam-satrotam

Vishnu sahasranama

The Vishnu Sahasranama (Sanskrit: Viṣṇusahasranāma, विष्णुसहस्रनाम), a tatpurusha compound, is a list of 1,000 names (sahasranama) of Vishnu, one of the main forms of God in Hinduism and the personal supreme God for Vaishnavas (followers of Vishnu). It is also one of the most sacred and commonly chanted stotras in Hinduism. The Vishnusahasranama as found in the Anushasana Parva of the Mahabharata is the most popular version of the 1,000 names of Vishnu. Other versions exists in the Padma Purana, Skanda Purana and Garuda Purana. Each name eulogizes one of his countless great attributes.

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Surdas-Aur-Bhramargeet

Surdas Aur Bhramargeet
By Sur Das

Surdas was a late 15th-century blind saint, poet and musician, known for his devotional songs dedicated to Lord Krishna. Surdas is said to have written and composed a hundred thousand songs in his magnum opus the ‘Sur Sagar’ (Ocean of Melody), out of which only about 8,000 are extant. He is considered a saguna bhakti poet and so also known as Sant Surdas, a name which literally means the “”servant of melody””. His most famous work was ‘Charan kamal bando hari rai’ ( चरण कमल बंदौ हरी राई ) which means I pray to the lotus feet of Shree Hari.

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Shri-Sur-Sagar

Sursagar
By Surdas

Sūrsāgar, a work that is admired throughout the Hindi-speaking areas of northern India. It is particularly rich in its details of daily life and in its sensitive perception of human emotion, the parent’s for the child and the maiden’s for her lover.

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Kirttana-Ghosha-by-Sankardev

Kirttana Ghosha
by Sankardev

The Kirtan Ghoxa (Assamese: কীৰ্তন ঘোষা) is a collection of poetical works, primarily composed by the medieval saint Srimanta Sankardev meant for community singing in the Ekasarana religion. Its importance in the religion is second only to the primary text, the Bhagavat of Sankardeva.

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The-Life-Divine-Vol-1

The Life Divine Vol 1
By Shree Aurobindo

The Life Divine explores for the Modern mind the great streams of Indian metaphysical thought, reconciling the truths behind each and from this synthesis extends in terms of consciousness the concept of evolution. The unfolding of earth’s and man’s spiritual destiny is illuminated. The Life Divine is Sri Aurobindo’s principal philosophical work in which he presents a theory of spiritual evolution, which will culminate in the human being and the advent of a divine life on the earth.

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The-Life-Divine-Vol-2

The Life Divine Vol 2
By Shree Aurobindo

The Life Divine explores for the Modern mind the great streams of Indian metaphysical thought, reconciling the truths behind each and from this synthesis extends in terms of consciousness the concept of evolution. The unfolding of earth’s and man’s spiritual destiny is illuminated. The Life Divine is Sri Aurobindo’s principal philosophical work in which he presents a theory of spiritual evolution, which will culminate in the human being and the advent of a divine life on the earth.

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Tukaram-abhang

Tukaram Abhang

Tukaram was a 17th-century poet-saint of the Bhakti movement in Maharashtra. He was part of the egalitarian, personalized Varkari devotionalism tradition.Tukaram is known for his Abhanga devotional poetry and community-oriented worship with spiritual songs known as kirtans. His poetry was devoted to Vitthala or Vithoba, an avatar of Hindu god Vishnu.

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Stories-Of-Indian-Saints-Vol-1-by-Justin-E-Abbot

Stories of Indian saints vol 1
By Justin E Abbot

This book is an English translation of Mahipati’s Marathi text “”Bhakta Vijaya”” which records the legends of Indian saints, irrespective of their difference in caste, community, creed, language and place of origin. What little knowledge we have on the Saints of Maharashtra comes mostly from the two books, Bhakta Vijaya and Bhakta Lilamrita, written by Mahipati (1715 – 1790) who lived in Tharabad, about 35 miles from Ahmadnagar, Maharashtra.

“Bhakta Vijaya” contains soul-stirring stories of several saints including Jayadeva, Tulsidas, Matsyendranath, Gorakhnath, Jnaneshwar, Eknath, Tukaram, Namdev, Janabai, Gora, Kabir, Rohidas, Narsi Mehta, Ramdas, Sena, Mirabai, Bhanudas, et al Bhakta Vijaya has been translated into almost all prominent Indian languages. It has been a source of inspiration to millions of devotees and has been used for daily reading and Harikatha all over India for more than 300 years.

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Stories-Of-Indian-Saints-vol-2-by-Justin-E-Abbot

Stories of Indian saints vol 2
By Justin E Abbot

This book is an English translation of Mahipati’s Marathi text “”Bhakta Vijaya”” which records the legends of Indian saints, irrespective of their difference in caste, community, creed, language and place of origin. What little knowledge we have on the Saints of Maharashtra comes mostly from the two books, Bhakta Vijaya and Bhakta Lilamrita, written by Mahipati (1715 – 1790) who lived in Tharabad, about 35 miles from Ahmadnagar, Maharashtra.

“”Bhakta Vijaya”” contains soul-stirring stories of several saints including Jayadeva, Tulsidas, Matsyendranath, Gorakhnath, Jnaneshwar, Eknath, Tukaram, Namdev, Janabai, Gora, Kabir, Rohidas, Narsi Mehta, Ramdas, Sena, Mirabai, Bhanudas, et al Bhakta Vijaya has been translated into almost all prominent Indian languages. It has been a source of inspiration to millions of devotees and has been used for daily reading and Harikatha all over India for more than 300 years.

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Satyarth-Prakash-by-Dayanand-Saraswati

Satyarth Prakash
By Dayanand Saraswati

The Light of Meaning of the Truth”” or The Light of Truth) is a 1875 book written originally in Hindi by Maharishi Dayanand Saraswati, a renowned religious and social reformer and the founder of Arya Samaj. It is considered one of his major scholarly works. The book was subsequently revised by Swami Dayanand Saraswathy in 1882 and has now been translated into more than 20 languages including Sanskrit and several foreign languages like English, French, German, Swahili, Arabic and Chinese. The major portion of the book is dedicated to laying down the reformist advocacy of Swami Dayanand with the last three chapters making a case for comparative study of different religious faiths.

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